Panasonic KX-TGP500 VoIP DECT Telephones configure for Asterisk

Configuring the Panasonic KX-TGP500 Telephones for use with Asterisk.

The Administrator’s Manual
Panasonic Product Page for the KX-TGP500
Firmware and Manuals from the Panasonic Site

DECT telephones offer advantages for wireless because they use different frequencies than WiFi. I have 3 telephones registered with the base unit and the base unit is registered with an Asterisk ver.13 PBX as SIP extension 7005 using voicemail box 8005. (This means that when the extension is called, all 3 telephones ring. The phones can be configured to ring individually on different extensions. That is up to the user.) This DECT set is working with the Asterisk ver.13 configurations found in my previous post, title: Configuration Files for Asterisk v.13 and AllStar Link . The network it is configured for is a HSMM-Mesh Network, so if it were to be configured for a normal LAN the host names would change to IP addresses.

Quick Start: A newly purchased KX-TGP500 base unit that is “open” (that is not pre-configured by a provider) and a KX-TPA50 handset need to be powered on. The handset needs to be registered with the base. To register the phone with the base you need to do the following:

  1. Open the menu of the handset by pressing down on the joystick on the telephone
  2. Then press #130 on the telephone dial pad
  3. There is a button located on the DECT base unit. Press it down for 4 seconds
  4. Then press OK on the Telephone, which will be the button to the right of the word menu just under the screen.
  5. Then dial 0000 on the telephone. Once it returns to the normal screen the handset should be registered and show you a number beside the battery symbol in the screen.

This needs to be done for each phone being registered.

To open the HTML configuration for the base unit, you need to press the joystick on the telephone down and then select the “tool box”, “Network Settings”, “Embedded Web”, and then “On”. The phone will sound a long tone. Then from a web browser sharing the same LAN, type in the IP address of the DECT base unit. You can find this IP address on the telephone by pressing down on the joystick and selecting the tool box icon, then Network Settings, then IP settings. Log into the DECT Base unit HTML configuration with the default username Admin and default password adminpass. Select the VoIP tab on the top menu, and then “line 1” under “SIP Menu” from the left sidebar menu. You should now be on a page that looks like this image:
dect base web menuYou may want to change the addresses from ka7u-2 to your host name or IP address and the extension number is the authentication ID in my Asterisk PBX. The authentication password is the “secret” for the extension as listed in sip.conf.

This should be enough configuration for the DECT phone system to work with Asterisk ver. 13 PBX. There are many other configurations according to your needs.

Ron Morell
KA7U

 

Raspberry Pi2 RTL_TCP Server

The Raspberry Pi2 makes a nice RTL_TCP server. You can place it anywhere on the network close to a good antenna. The sample rate requires good throughput on the Network and generally Ethernet has more throughput than WiFi and Ethernet is preferred for connectivity on the LAN. Fast WiFi will work however. So to setup the RPi2 for this service, you will first install Raspbian Jessie on the SanDisk card and boot the Pi with it. Once you have logged in to the Pi, open a terminal and do the following:

  1. Passwd
  2. sudo raspi-config
  3. sudo apt-get update
  4. sudo apt-get upgrade
  5. sudo rpi-update
  6. reboot
    log back into the Raspberry Pi
  7. cd /etc/modprobe.d
  8. sudo nano rasp-blacklist.conf #and add the following, then save the file:
    blacklist dvb_usb_rtl28xxu
    blacklist rtl2832
    blacklist rtl2830
  9. sudo update-initramfs -u
  10. cd
  11. sudo apt-get install git
  12. sudo apt-get install cmake
  13. sudo apt-get install libusb-1.0-0.dev
  14. sudo apt-get install build-essential
  15. sudo apt-get autoremove
  16. git clone git://git.osmocom.org/rtl-sdr.git
  17. cd rtl-sdr
  18. mkdir build
  19. cd build
  20. cmake ../
  21. make
  22. sudo make install
  23. sudo ldconfig
  24. cd /etc/udev
  25. sudo cp ~/rtl-sdr/rtl-sdr.rules ./
  26. sudo reboot
Log back into the Pi and start the RTL_TCP Service with:
 rtl_tcp -a <the Pi's IP address>

Then using SDR# or HDSDR or whatever receiver you use on your local computer, configure the TCP interface for the server’s IP address and set the sample rate and other parameters as appropriate to start receiving from the RTL-DVB USB receiver served by the Raspberry Pi.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSq39ydjlQU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQ2N2wZe03A

Ron – KA7U
March 4, 2016

Asterisk ver.13 on the Raspberry Pi2

When I needed to install Asterisk on the RPi2 I searched google and found this “how to”:
http://www.klaverstyn.com.au/david/wiki/index.php?title=Asterisk_Install_on_Debian
Never wanting to reinvent the wheel and noting that this install provides many useful options, I followed the recipe there. For my archive I have copied the instruction set below.

The configurations that bridge this PBX with my AllStar Link system will follow in the next post.
Ron – KA7U
March 3, 2016

To install Asterisk on a Rapsberry Pi with a Debian based system.

Dependencies

apt-get -y install libv4l-dev ffmpeg libx264-130
cd /usr/src
wget http://www.libsdl.org/release/SDL2-2.0.4.tar.gz
tar xvf SDL2-2.0.4.tar.gz
rm -f SDL2-2.0.4.tar.gz
cd SDL2-2.0.4
./configure
make
make install
cd /usr/src
wget http://www.pjsip.org/release/2.4.5/pjproject-2.4.5.tar.bz2
tar xvf pjproject-2.4.5.tar.bz2
rm -f pjproject-2.4.5.tar.bz2
cd pjproject-2.4.5
./configure --enable-shared
make dep
make
make install
cd /usr/src/
wget http://www.digip.org/jansson/releases/jansson-2.7.tar.gz
tar xvf jansson-2.7.tar.gz
rm -f jansson-2.7.tar.gz
cd jansson-2.7
./configure
make
make install
make check
apt-get -y install libtiff5-dev
echo /usr/local/lib/ >> /etc/ld.so.conf
cd /usr/src
wget http://www.soft-switch.org/downloads/spandsp/spandsp-0.0.6.tar.gz
tar xvf spandsp-0.0.6.tar.gz
rm -f spandsp-0.0.6.tar.gz
cd spandsp-0.0.6
./configure
make
make install
ldconfig

Asterisk Prerequisite

apt-get -y install subversion libspeexdsp-dev libmyodbc unixodbc-dev libmysqlclient-dev libnewt-dev libncurses5-dev uuid-dev libxml2-dev libsqlite3-dev libssl-dev portaudio19-dev

Install Asterisk

cd /usr/src
wget http://downloads.asterisk.org/pub/telephony/asterisk/asterisk-13-current.tar.gz
tar xvf asterisk-13-current.tar.gz
rm -f asterisk-13-current.tar.gz
cd asterisk-13.7.0
./configure
./contrib/scripts/get_mp3_source.sh
make menuselect
make
make install
make config
make samples

Debian Cleanup

apt-get -y autoclean
apt-get -y autoremove

AllStar Link on the RPI2

After a few attempts to configure a Raspberry PI 2 to be an AllStar Link node, I finally settled on using the ARCH version that is discussed here:
http://crompton.com/hamradio/BeagleBoneBlackAllstar/

There is a group reflector that supports the users of this version of the AllStar Link system and it is found here:
http://lists.hamvoip.org/pipermail/arm-allstar/

KB4FXC and WA3DSP seem to be the active developers of this ARCH Linux AllStar Link system for the Raspberry PI 2. They have modified the app_rpt.so module to correct certain issues that seem common to other Raspberry PI and ARM processor implimentations of the software.

If you decided to install the AllStar Link software on a Raspberry PI 2 or BBB, and having successfully installed it, then if you are interested in some of my configurations read on.

The ARCH image is minimal as it is delivered. Everything you need for the service is there and then some, but if you want something else, well then it might be a problem because if you update the repositories you will bring in dependencies that are not compatible and will break the software. For example I wanted the terminal shell called “Screen”. If you use Screen you know why, if you don’t well then it might not matter, but the example of how I installed it will be useful to you for other things you might want to add. There are archived repositories available for ARCH and you can find the appropriate versions of software to match with the ARCH image you are using.
http://fraggod.net/static/mirror/packages/archlinuxarm/armv7h/  This link should take you to the program archives that contain useful programs for the RPi2_VER1.0_ALLSTAR.zip image, if that is the one you have installed. If not, you will need to ask on the reflector for the correct archive… Next you need to try to determine which program version will work with the dependencies already installed on your system.  I guessed by checking version and date info on gcc.
[root@AllStar-KA7U ~]# gcc –version
gcc (GCC) 4.9.2 20141224 (prerelease)
Then a scan of the gcc versions available in the archive led me to believe the install package dated around Nov-Dec of 2014. Then scanning the Screen versions I found one that was created in that time frame and took a chance that it was good in the system. I found this one: screen-4.2.1-3-armv7h.pkg.tar.xz 12-Nov-2014 03:37 , and so it would be installed using:
pacman -U http://fraggod.net/static/mirror/packages/archlinuxarm/armv7h/screen-4.2.1-3-armv7h.pkg.tar.xz 
and that worked just fine.

Once the AllStar Link system is installed and configured with the first boot and login, I wanted to configure a telephone system to work with it. The AllStar Link system is an Asterisk PBX and functions for that purpose, but newer versions of Asterisk (ver.13 at this time) offer better security and NAT traversal without port forwarding, as well as voice mail and all the other modern features of telephone systems, so I decided to setup another Raspberry Pi2 running Asterisk ver.13 and use a SIP bridge to connect them. This configuration is involved and will be covered in another post.

Ron – KA7U
March 3, 2016